A Life-Drama and Other Poems Alexander Smith

ISBN: 9781151342591

Published: May 13th 2012

Paperback

94 pages


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A Life-Drama and Other Poems  by  Alexander Smith

A Life-Drama and Other Poems by Alexander Smith
May 13th 2012 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, RTF | 94 pages | ISBN: 9781151342591 | 7.47 Mb

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1859 Excerpt: ...streets, --Of pinioned men, their necksMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text.

Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1859 Excerpt: ...streets, --Of pinioned men, their necks upon the block, Axe gleaming in the air. WALTER. Away, away Break not, my Edward, this consummate hour- For very oft within the year thats past Ive fought against thy drifts of wintry thought Till they put out my fires, and I have lain, A volcano choked with snow.

Now let me rest If I should wear a rose but once in life, You surely would not tear it leaf from leaf, And trample all its sweetness in the dust Thy dreary thoughts will make my festal heart As empty and as desolates a church When worshippers are gone and night comes down. Spare me this happy hour, and let me rest EDWARD. The banquet you do set before your joys Is surely but indifferently served, When they so readily vacate their seats.

Walter abstractedly). Would I could raise the dead I am as happy as the singing heavens--There was one very dear to me that died, With heart as vacant as a last-years nest. O, could I bring her back, Id empty mine, And brim hers with my joy --enough for both. Edward after a pause). The garrulous sea is talking to the shore, Let us go down and hear the graybeards speech. They walk along the sands. I shall go down to Bedfordshire to-morrow. Will you go with me?

WALTER. Whom shall we see there? t EDWARD. Why, various specimens of that biped, Man. I 11 show y?u. one who might have been an abbot In the old time- a large and portly man, With merry eyes, and crown that shines like glass. No thin-smiled April he, bedript with tears, But appled-Autumn, golden-cheeked and tan- A jest in his mouth feels sweet as crusted wine. As if all eager for a merry thought, The pits of laughter dimple in his cheeks. His speech is flavorous, evermore he talks In a warm, brown, autumnal sort of style.

A worthy man, Sir who shall stand at ...



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